Corrente

If you have "no place to go," come here!

ZOMG! Final coats!

Oil-based floor, latex walls!

Hardly seems worth it, what with no alchohol fumes from the shellac-based primer! But one must labor to be beautiful!

Then, I can get outside and start planting the tomatos....

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BDBlue's picture
Submitted by BDBlue on

I grew up in the midwest with my mother's garden and now I'm stuck eating crappy, tasteless tomatos in Los Angeles. Let's say someone with a brown thumb wanted to grow some decent tasting tomatos. What kind would one grow?

Submitted by lambert on

I really liked Early Girl tomatoes, but the Beefsteak weren't too bad, either.

I'll let you know when I plant them -- shamefully, I go to my local hardware store and buy plants. Next year, I will follow FeralLiberal's path and start my own seeds.

[x] Any (D) in the general. [ ] ?????. [ ] Any mullah-sucking billionaire-teabagging torture-loving pus-encrusted spawn of Cthulhu, bless his (R) heart.

orionATL's picture
Submitted by orionATL on

you can grow tomatoes in a pot on your patio

or in a small plot in your yard, if you have one.

remember this:

- tomatoes do not like wet feet, you pot or plot must drain well.

tomatoes like lots of sunshine

tomatoes do not like lots and lots of heat - like 95 deg heat.

fertilize early, but avoid fertilizing too much when the blooms come along, else you'll get lots of leaves and fewer yummies.

kinds:

grape tomatoes, cherry tomatoes,(both have tough skins)

roma tomatoes (oblong, pear shaped)

regular tomatoes called "better boy" and "big boy" are sold where i live,

but then i don't live in a desert.

when you plant your tomatoes, plant them in a (relatively) deep hole, so only the top leaves are showing. they will get lots more roots this way and so produce more.

good luck

cenobite's picture
Submitted by cenobite on

You should have no trouble finding great tomatoes at a farmer's market.

The climate is highly suitable for growing tomatoes.

Submitted by lambert on

There are very very few experiences more wonderful than eating and tasting a fresh-picked tomato, right off the vine, still warm from the sun, with some mozarella -- wish I could make some this summer -- and maybe some fleur de sel for piquancy.

[x] Any (D) in the general. [ ] ?????. [ ] Any mullah-sucking billionaire-teabagging torture-loving pus-encrusted spawn of Cthulhu, bless his (R) heart.

Salmo's picture
Submitted by Salmo on

Grape tomatoes produce early, yield abundantly, and they are great snacks. While they are available at various markets, the sweet taste of them freshly picked is reason enough to plant a tub of them on the patio. My daughter planted some upside down, so the plants could hang the fruit instead of needing to be tied up. We're doing that this year.

BDBlue's picture
Submitted by BDBlue on

I've found some good ones there. But it's been kind of hit and miss.

Submitted by brucedixon on

but you still have time to grow something from seed if you have the patience. Look for seed from "heirloom" varieties, if possible. Get on Google, there are plenty of suppliers, and some types do better in the heat than others.

Heirloom means these are the ones your grandparents and great grandparents used, that will produce fertile seeds. Many, perhaps most of the varieties you buy at Home Depot or somewhere like that are hybrids or even genetically modified things whose DNA may be legally "owned" by some giant agribusiness corporation, and do not breed true, may not even sprout a second generation.

Heirlooms are owned by nobody. They just grow, and you can get seed from them that grows true.

Good luck.

Bruce Dixon
www.blackagendareport.com

Salmo's picture
Submitted by Salmo on

I used some sewage treatment plant compost as one of the ingredients to reclaim an old gravel pit a couple of years ago. Hundreds of tomato plants came up, mostly cherry or grape varieties. Nobody claimed to have owned the DNA, which is too bad. I would have enjoyed the trial. They were good.

BDBlue's picture
Submitted by BDBlue on

I think I may try some. I like the idea of heirlooms from seeds. I particularly like the idea that agribusiness doesn't own them (thanks for pointing that out Bruce). Now, to just actually go do it. Since gardening is one of those things that I want to do and to enjoy, but somehow the best laid plans always end up in overgrown, untended plants with little eaten fruit.

Submitted by lambert on

So they don't have tips!

[rimshot. laughter]

[x] Any (D) in the general. [ ] ?????. [ ] Any mullah-sucking billionaire-teabagging torture-loving pus-encrusted spawn of Cthulhu, bless his (R) heart.

orionATL's picture
Submitted by orionATL on

just get some plants from home depot or the hardware store and transplant them. you'll get better results, have fun, be more easily rewarded, and be ready to try seeds next spring.