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Whither Saint Jobs

okanogen's picture

Steve Jobs, patron saint of bohos and hipsters, has his halo tarnished by class-action discovery, and it couldn't happen to a more deserving asshat:

In early 2005, as demand for Silicon Valley engineers began booming, Apple’s Steve Jobs sealed a secret and illegal pact with Google’s Eric Schmidt to artificially push their workers wages lower by agreeing not to recruit each other’s employees, sharing wage scale information, and punishing violators.

It's amazing to me how the clueless "tech-savvy" aspiring class can't contain themselves, lapping up the shit of fashionable plutocrats (Jobs), and politicians (Obama), who offer them feel-good, affirming cultural validation.

Here is a fabulous section of this article:

The secret wage-theft agreements between Apple, Google, Intel, Adobe, Intuit, and Pixar (now owned by Disney) are described in court papers obtained by PandoDaily as “an overarching conspiracy” in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act, and at times it reads like something lifted straight out of the robber baron era that produced those laws. Today’s inequality crisis is America’s worst on record since statistics were first recorded a hundred years ago — the only comparison would be to the era of the railroad tycoons in the late 19th century.

Do Robber Barons give reach-arounds?

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Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

I guess you're a Bill Gates fan.

The United States Postal Service today approved a commemorative Steve Jobs stamp that will be printed as part of a collectible series next year, according to The Washington Post

Get an iPhone: get a life.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

Why don't they make a Charles Koch stamp while they are at it? I imagine they have Milton Friedman, Ronald Reagan, Dick Cheney, etc., so why not?

Anyway, I didn't know I was required to root for any particular oligarch. Do I get to be a Linus Torvalds fan, or is that not allowed? And what does Bill Gates have to do with it? I'm sure he has his own crimes which should be prosecuted.

On point, Steve Jobs (in particular, but also the entire culture he was a part of) drove a criminal conspiracy of monopolistic collusion to drive down the wages of hundreds of thousands of people. Which in turn drove down the wages of millions more through their lack of spending. At the same time, his cabal was involved in a propaganda campaign to drive up H1B visa approvals to further suppress U.S. worker wages. Isn't this a blog where that is a concern?

If Steve Jobs was in the same business as a Koch brother, nobody would expect anything different, and we are supposed to worship the ground he trod on because "iPhone"?

Spare me.

Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

I was just making light of what seems to be with you a rather personal intense feeling. Steve Jobs was visionary. Desktop publishing was ushered in with his Mac; this changed a lot of people's lives. His business practices are open to question.
I was off-base suggesting that you would be a fan of Bill Gates. I am amused that the common wisdom Bill Gates is philanthropist beyond reproach. As a teacher I'm seeing his billion-dollar push from common core screwing up an otherwise decent job

Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

Was Edison a visionary? Or just a good businessman? I'd say the award for visionary over businessman goes to Steve (see my bias, we're on a first mame basis.) the tech employed by Apple and Pixar was already laying around its true.

Jobs himself lacked the knowledge and skill to engineer such a feat. But he had something better, a clear vision of what the computer could be.
http://www.jeremystatton.com/vision-of-steve-jobs

Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

I would love to see a popular movement spring up around the 12 plank platform. It will require vision:

Strategy without vision is worthless.

We need to know what we want. We need to know where we are headed.

We need to dream a vision that is impossibly large, but will change the world.

http://www.jeremystatton.com/vision-of-steve-jobs

Not a shameless plug for Mr. jobs; but, the article which ascribes this "vision thing" to him does lay out some useful qualities.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

Check this from 1968. Obviously a person "without vision". I love that lickspittle blog though. Saint Jobs!

Submitted by lambert on

Here.

Engelbart should have the billions, but of course he didn't. Pipsqueaks like Zuckerberg do.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

Or NOBODY should have billions. He died, mostly unheralded, last summer. But what strikes me about that demonstration is the lack of personal grandiosity. Even when he points out that the staffing of the project was most of the time just himself. It's a deprecation, rather than a resume-builder. The times were different back then, and the pursuit of a common goal through hard work and collaboration was the cultural norm. Now that attitude is laughed at, it's the "visionary genius" that celebrated. The "Great Man" view of achievement. That is why the incredible feats of the unnamed legions at NASA at that time are barely acknowledged, instead we are pummeled by the pedestrian business antics of Jobs, Gates, Zuckerberg, et.al., who are worshipped as technological visionaries.

"Great Thinkers", meh.

Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

Zukerberg. Another champion of school privatization. (See Zukerberg>NJ> Chhristie>education.)

My point is that 1984 – 1968 = 16 years. That’s the time it took for the technology that Engelbart demonstrated to be adapted successfully for commercialization in the mass market.

This unfortunate unknown's vision didn't gel. Clyde Beatty: "bring 'em back alive."

Submitted by Hugh on

There was a link on this a week or two ago at Naked Capitalism. It reads like a Silicon Valley's who's who of billionaires who were in on this including George Lucas who looks like an ewok but acts like Darth Vader. The interesting aspect of this is that this info comes from a civil suit by some techies who were affected, but the Justice Department decided not to pursue criminal charges in a joke settlement a few years ago.

JoeInSF's picture
Submitted by JoeInSF on

The sooner people reject the entire Cult of the CEO, the sooner people will stop caring about their opinions.
I've worked in Bay Area tech for over 25 years. Steve Jobs was really smart. So are a lot of other people who contributed to "user-friendly" products that have changed a lot of people's lives. Jobs also made a lot of bad decisions, but the PR machine blurs those over.
He was a greedy pig and a notorious A-hole to work for or with. I had the great displeasure to meet him once. Wow!
And don't get me started about Facebook "inventing" social media.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

Don't believe the hype. Public Enemy had is so damn right.

Submitted by Hugh on

As an aside, many of the tech companies projected the image of the white hat corporation (Apple, Google) started by otherworldly dreamers in their dorm room or garage or if not that, the everyman's producer of tech products (Microsoft). I doubt how much of the idealism was ever true. It was certainly exploited in PR terms. The reality is that as soon as any of these companies achieved any market share, they immediately embraced every monopolistic anti-competitive anti-labor trick they could find. Jobs was just a Koch with a touch screen. They all are.