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Wherein I attempt to define neoliberalism

Rangoon78's picture

Neoliberalism's goal is the formation of a supranational corporate totalitarian system, with an espoused "intense faith in the spontaneous responses of the market"1 to better the lot of the common man. Machiavellian in their conspicuous doling out of crumbs to wage slaves who are expressly excluded from any linkage of their needs/labors to the fruit of their labors. Its evangelists extol the virtues of entrepreneurship as the only vehicle for individuals to become participants in the upside of Neoliberal capitalism. The governments of nations will be maintained in the event of economic downturns to extract assets from workers as we saw in 2008-9 and United States.

1 Between Neoliberalism and Growth with Social Equity. Three Decades of Economic Policy in Chile Ricardo Ffrench-Davis

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Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

Helping to further define it:

We can define neoliberalism here as a means to promote the rule of the market, and drive the transfer of economic power from the public to the private sector. And in pursuing neoliberal models of growth, a huge amount of government energy is spent. We are told that support to big business is needed to secure the future, and that what is good for business is good for society. That rhetoric emphasises the social importance of free markets, flexible workers, freedom, open societies, and, more recently, fairness. All this adds up to a moral grammar of everyday life. In short, neoliberalism is underpinned by particular social values, norms and beliefs.

So how is this “common good” projected? Well, first of all, neo-liberals make major claims in defence of what they call economic freedom. This claim is generally made from an anti-state and anti-collectivist position and stresses the economic freedom of individuals. Collective trade union freedoms and social rights are, from this perspective, constructed as the enemies of freedom as are state interventions in markets on behalf of the broader social or public interest.

Claims like this are normative, since they seek to position neoliberal policies as being in the public interest (driving competitiveness, growth, exports), and making a contribution to a “good” society. Thus, neoliberal constructions of market freedom simply tie the public interest to that of the market and of the private sector.

Mis-direction

These ideas seek to infiltrate our entire moral view of the world. Neoliberal restructuring is therefore a political-economic and moral project that targets not just the economy, but also society and culture, in its ambition to re-create societies as ever more crass capitalist market societies. As Margaret Thatcher once rather chillingly said in an interview with the Sunday Times: “Economics are the method, but the object is to change the soul”.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/06/23/how-neoliberalisms-moral-order-fe...

Rangoon78's picture
Submitted by Rangoon78 on

Obama is one of the most effective proponents of this greedy dogma, bringing The acceptance this mindset to people who still identify themselves as progressives or liberals: p

We can define neoliberalism here as a means to promote the rule of the market, and drive the transfer of economic power from the public to the private sector. And in pursuing neoliberal models of growth, a huge amount of government energy is spent. We are told that support to big business is needed to secure the future, and that what is good for business is good for society. That rhetoric emphasises the social importance of free markets, flexible workers, freedom, open societies, and, more recently, fairness. All this adds up to a moral grammar of everyday life. In short, neoliberalism is underpinned by particular social values, norms and beliefs.

So how is this “common good” projected? Well, first of all, neo-liberals make major claims in defence of what they call economic freedom. This claim is generally made from an anti-state and anti-collectivist position and stresses the economic freedom of individuals. Collective trade union freedoms and social rights are, from this perspective, constructed as the enemies of freedom as are state interventions in markets on behalf of the broader social or public interest.

Claims like this are normative, since they seek to position neoliberal policies as being in the public interest (driving competitiveness, growth, exports), and making a contribution to a “good” society. Thus, neoliberal constructions of market freedom simply tie the public interest to that of the market and of the private sector.

Mis-direction

These ideas seek to infiltrate our entire moral view of the world. Neoliberal restructuring is therefore a political-economic and moral project that targets not just the economy, but also society and culture, in its ambition to re-create societies as ever more crass capitalist market societies. As Margaret Thatcher once rather chillingly said in an interview with the Sunday Times: “Economics are the method, but the object is to change the soul”.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/06/23/how-neoliberalisms-moral-order-fe...