Corrente

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What can you bring to the table?

gqmartinez's picture

Cause an "old school liberal" movement will be outgunned financially. We won't have access to the media. We won't have an infrastructure and decades worth of volunteer and voting lists. We will be ridiculed or called racists. You know, just like a standard day hangin' around this C-list cesspool.

We're gonna need people who can run campaigns at the precint level. We're gonna have to find new ways to get our message out. We are going to need people familiar with parliamentary rules so that if we have good officials, we can use "Teh RuleZ" as a way to force the hands of the majority leaders. And so forth. Preferably, doing this without having to rely too much on a professional class of political folks (because, as someone who was very close to chosing that career path, I now view that as part of the problem).

What can Correntians bring to the table? We've all got talents and experience. And you wanna know what? Sewing dog outfits to raise money is something we can use. And if all you can do is touch your nose with your tongue, we'll need your comic relief as well.

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cwaltz's picture
Submitted by cwaltz on

I have time available to help and I have experience dealing with people with a conservative mindset(It's really hard to call a veteran a terrorist lover and sound credible). I spent 12 years in uniform, eight of them in the "socialized Navy medicine as a pharmacy technician." I am married to a man who served for several years with the SEAL teams as a communicator as an Electronics Tech. I can hardly sew to save my life but I do have a lovely assistant(my daughter) who likes making baked goods and a seventeen year old son that liked helping work the booth back before I came to the realization that both parties suck.

Oh and we usually have a couple bucks we can burn for a good cause. Nothing huge but if combined with other folks seed money it might make a difference.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

and I'm a singer and I give good radio. I also could try my hand at creating some viral Youtube videos.

Oh, and I write plays too.

jumpjet's picture
Submitted by jumpjet on

Aristotle did note the important connection between politics and drama.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

a lot of liberals are involved in the arts.

Sometimes a work of art can change the political conversation. Look at Uncle Tom's Cabin, for example. Look at Obama's viral videos. Hell, after Governor Paterson's latest ad campaign, I'm pretty sure I'm going to vote for him.

Andre's picture
Submitted by Andre on

see how many people would sign on to this mission statement? The name isn't important, but giving people a set of principals, goals, and a broad plan for reaching the goals and implementing the principals would let them sign onto something to which they can commit themselves. I think it should be as broad as possible without giving up substance. But it shoud cover the whole Liberal spectrum, IMO.

Andre's picture
Submitted by Andre on

"What do our opponents mean when they apply to us the label "Liberal?" If by "Liberal" they mean, as they want people to believe, someone who is soft in his policies abroad, who is against local government, and who is unconcerned with the taxpayer's dollar, then ... we are not that kind of "Liberal." But if by a "Liberal" they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people -- their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights, and their civil liberties -- someone who believes we can break through the stalemate and suspicions that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by a "Liberal," then I'm proud to say I'm a "Liberal." [September 14, 1960]"

Submitted by lambert on

... I'm in the "bold, persistent experimentation" camp. There seems to be a desire to strike out on our own, given the FKDP performance post-2006. I can see at least four strands of this, many of whom have posted here, and some of whom will again: NWP (+ERA), Greens, disaffected Hillary suppporters (some, but not all of whom, identify as PUMAs, whatever that may mean), single payer mobilization. (For my money, the NWP strand is furthest along the road toward organizing, simply because feminism has a great depth of experience and analysis. Mobilization for health care is a close second, because they're out there getting arrested.) We can't know how any of this is going to work out, or what will click. I'd argue that it's more important that all these strands learn to adapt and survive in local environments than it is they "share common principles." I'd suggest agreements on method are more important, like: (1) Don't make shit up, (2) don't steal elections, and stuff like that.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

to try to work with the existing women's organizations, starting with NOW (which has been mostly very good since Terry O'Neill took over), and try to get them to focus on detaching themselves from the Democratic Party and becoming real spokespeople for women's rights and the passage of the ERA. They have money, a national and local presence, and are getting feet on the street already. And, they have been sharply critical of the Dems for the crapulent health care bills they've been putting forth.

I tried to start a local group in NY based on some of these principles, but it didn't really go anywhere. That's why I think it's easier and faster to work with an existing, sympathetic group.

This could be one of the strands.

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

That's key. When I was a Dem activist, I had a friend who was a Green and I remember always telling him that Dems--specifically, *me*--need to always have pressure from the left. Ironically, he jumped on the Obama bandwagon and I'm the outsider. He never asked me to pressure him from the left. Sad, that.

So many groups have tied themselves to the Dems. Unions, specifically. And that is a big reason they are constantly getting screwed. There are many liberal groups that are playing by yesterday's rules and sticking with the Dems just 'cause. Breaking them of that habit is a good start. But we will still face hurdles as an outside movement.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

When you say "I'll vote Dem no matter what," you have given your power away. That's why I'm hoping that those who are on the women's rights bandwagon will work with nonpartisan groups like NOW, becoming a voting bloc that pushes the Democrats towards social justice.

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

We need to push *all* politicians toward social justice. Folks may or may not remember, but this is what Party Invariance (Google it) is all about. Shifting the Overton Window left by ignoring the Dem-GOP demarcations, which are becoming more and more arbitrary.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

To move left, that would be fantastic. I hear what you're saying.

I just see so much resistance in the GOP base these days, I think it would be easier to concentrate on the Dems. For example, NY-23, where Sarah Palin and her friends Dick Armey (the force behind the Tea Party movement), Michelle Malkin et al, forced the moderate Republican woman out of the race because she was pro-choice and pro-same-sex marriage. They made the GOP endorse the Conservative candidate, Doug Hoffman, who is anti-everything. (The Repubs lost the seat.)

The GOP does have a more socially moderate faction that seems to want to prevail over the wingnuts (Michael Steele, Meghan McCain, both pro-choice and pro-same sex marriage.) The problem is, the wingnuts are far more organized and scrappy than the moderates seem to be.

jumpjet's picture
Submitted by jumpjet on

I either want to help someone run for office, or run for office myself. I want to be right in the thick of changing the course of events at my local level, and maybe at my national level as well. I want to make change and I don't want it to stop. To that end, I'm told I'm a pretty good writer, and I've been known to speak well in the past also, though I've rarely given formal speeches.

Also, I seem to be one of the younger people here, so I've got some extra energy to burn.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

I am only comfortable being in the spotlight when I'm playing a character. I just can't bring myself to run for office.

But if you do it, I'll throw some bucks your way for sure!

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

I'd really like to run for office, something small, like school board, especially school board. I have a school age kid, and I want to ensure that she receives a good education, along with all her peers. I mean, I can work with her at home to make sure she's doing alright, but what about the rest?

Of course, while I'm outgoing and personable, I'm also a loudmouth abrasive woman who doesn't back down easily. Oh, and I've got enough dirt in my background to make muckrakers wriggle with glee.

So, I guess I can sew dog costumes.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

seems like you'd fit in to any school board just fine.

As for the dirt...well, when Governor Paterson took over from Eliot "can't keep it in my pants" Spitzer, he held a press conference, in which he told the people of New York that both he and his wife had done cocaine and had been swingers in the past.

New York yawned and it was all over. It's not the scandal, it's the coverup.

:-)

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

I'd honestly hope that things would play out like that, but TEH CHILDRUNZ would get dragged into it and...

Plus, I'd be mortified if my mother found out some of the things I've done. ;)

Fitting into the school board isn't the problem, it's holding my mouth in check to get there that is. That, coupled with my professional insecurity, since I don't have a college degree(not required, but helpful, IMO)

It's been an idea that's been floating for awhile, and if it ever comes to fruition, I'll let you know.

*Sorry, but my last neighbor was from Long Island, and that's how he pronounced it.

Submitted by hipparchia on

didn't she start off in politics because of her kids being in the school system?

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

I've done local politics enough to know that these races almost never turn to mudslinging on a large scale. Very rarely are personal issues made public.

Submitted by lambert on

After the election, we still have to live in the same place -- our homes are not "fly over homes" as it were.

john.halle's picture
Submitted by john.halle on

I would be willing to offer significant financial support to this objective if I can be convinced that it will be seriously undertaken.

Also, since there was no objection to my linking to articles I have written on this subject, here is one which was published in the journal New Politics some years ago.

Most of the points remain current and are, I think, directly relevant to the discussion we are having here. I'd be glad to discuss what's happened since.

I also have articles on the nuts and bolts of running a campaign for local office; if folks are interested in those, I will post links to those as well.

Submitted by lambert on

Sure, the more articles the better, and also, please check your mail.

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

I have a lot of campaign experience, city council all the way up. I was in charge of all the data from a winning city council campaign (voter lists, fundraising lists, volunteer lists, ...). I've even helped organize campaign training events for hundreds of people over the years, from college dem groups to 30 something groups. I know what needs to be done and can help people plan and find what they need.

jumpjet's picture
Submitted by jumpjet on

Maybe this is how it could work. People like you could be giving other people advice over the internets, and people like me could put it to use.

jjmtacoma's picture
Submitted by jjmtacoma on

Really, you do. I can't think of anything you wouldn't be good at.

Submitted by hipparchia on

i live for research.

i've considered running for office, and may yet, but i hate being on tv.

jjmtacoma's picture
Submitted by jjmtacoma on

and Google!

Really. It doesn't take much to get me interested in digging for information on pretty much any topic.

I've been told I should run for office by more than a few people... I love policy but, I'm not really that outgoing, I hate meetings and I am a feminist. The feminist thing freaks some people out once they get to know me well enough to realize it. Oh, and I dropped out of college to get married and work.

When I was employed for $$ - I was a data analyst, system architect, computer programmer. I quit working for $$ a couple years ago. So, I guess I have time on my hands - or - I can get distracted by meatier things than laundry pretty easily.

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

Because I got pregnant and had to start working full time. I got into a lot of debt, especially with student loans, and it's been financially rocky since.

My daughter is great, and I love spending time with her, so the decision to work out something with the student loan people and go back to school has always been outweighed by wanting to be with her. I also know that in a few years, while she won't need her Mom any less, she won't need my physical presence in her life as much, and then I will return to the pursuits that would take away from our time playing video and board games, hiking in the woods, and carting her and her friends around on excursions.

Not that I don't spend time for myself, no one should be on Mom mode 24/7, IMO, but that's time for relaxation, taking some alone time for the Sailor, and pleasurable pursuits of the mind, instead of crawling through textbooks.

Submitted by hipparchia on

progressives, liberals, feminists, treehuggers, any ordinary citizen who is "left of the left" on anything. ordinary everyday people of reasonable intelligence and sanity need to be seen as caring about how their country [or town or county or school district] is run, and ideas such as medicare for all, ending the war[s], taking care of the environment, treating women as real people, are not scary or crazy or odd or unusual when your next door neighbor talks about them.

Submitted by hipparchia on

it's expensive to run a corporate-candidate-style campaign, but it appears to be ridiculously easy to qualify, and run, for office otherwise.

i'm sure there are more organizations and funding out there, mad google skillz needed for finding them!

jumpjet's picture
Submitted by jumpjet on

Moreover, it's a way of ensuring that liberal ideas are actually advanced at all levels of government. Don't recruit from outside the ranks of liberal activists, recruit from the inside.

Submitted by hipparchia on

does lending, as opposed to donations, run afoul of campaign financing laws?

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

If you are serious about running. Even if you're not. I haven't seen ya in a while :o).

S Brennan's picture
Submitted by S Brennan on

Over at Cannonfire their talking up Peter DeFazio - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_DeFazio

When he refused to support Obama's tax cuts for the rich and other giveaways to the same people who created this mess, Obama threaten revenge with the mobster line "Don't think we're not keeping score, brother". Which is pretty funny coming from Obama, a guy who never missed an opportunity to betray those who helped him, but were no longer needed.

While he did support "Obama's Insurance Welfare & Denial of Care for Women Act of 2009", he does seem like a good protest candidate.

caseyOR's picture
Submitted by caseyOR on

but he is disinclined to give up his House seat for any other office. People in Oregon have been trying for years to get him to run for governor or the senate, and he always toys with us for awhile then says "no." He has lots of seniority in the House and a key committee assignment on Transportation which is very important to him.

And Peter may well be the only politician who is even more blunt than Hillary Clinton. I like that, you all may like that, but a lot of other folks are put off by it.

On the other hand, Peter, who sleeps on the sofa in his House office and flies home every weekend, has been making noises that hint he may be tiring of the grinding travel. If that is the case, though, it seems more likely that he would opt for a gubernatorial run rather than the WH.

That said, people change, and I could be proven wrong. A key marker would be if the Dems lose control of the House in 2010, costing Peter his committee chairpersonship. That might push him to seek a new office, or it might push him to retire. Afterall, he is in his 60s.