Corrente

If you have "no place to go," come here!

So, why don't we turn the banks into regulated public utilities?

Bloomberg:

“We have a financial system that is run by private shareholders, managed by private institutions, and we’d like to do our best to preserve that system,” he told reporters today in Washington.

Well, why? Because the system is working so well?

I thought the Obama administration was all about doing what works?

Instead of hanging on to outmoded solutions for ideoligical reasons?

0
No votes yet

Comments

Sarah's picture
Submitted by Sarah on

that 93-year-old vet and similar victims of poverty -- and indeed, they are victims of poverty when they rely on VA pensions and/or Social Security in today's world where prices keep going up, despite the eight-year-long cries of No Inflation! from the Bush Government
( thank Ceiling Cat, FSM and all the gods THAT'S OVER!!) and income, oh, excuse me, "entitlements", don't keep pace -- as directly and as simply as installing usage limiters, why, the 1 percent of the wealthy would soon be a much bigger fraction of the population as the old, the ill, and the poverty-stricken simply died out. Of course, it would be a generation or two before the parasites ran out of old, ill, poverty-stricken people to feed off of, but que sera, sera. So, NO, I don't want the banks in control of city managers or mayors (eg Mayor Palin of Wasilla) as public, regulated utilities. I don't trust the middlemen.

Submitted by lambert on

... they wouldn't do what they did in Bay City (who I think are more in thrall to the banks). In fact, I'm not even sure power cutoffs in the winter are legal.

The answer is more regulation, not less.

I'm behind on my bill right now, because of fuel. So there's a payment plan, and I'lll be fine in the summer. There is no need for the load limiter at all. That's what happens when the spreadsheet guys are in charge.

Sarah's picture
Submitted by Sarah on

they wouldn't do what they did in Bay City (who I think are more in thrall to the banks). In fact, I'm not even sure power cutoffs in the winter are legal.

The answer is more regulation, not less.

I'm behind on my bill right now, because of fuel. So there's a payment plan, and I'lll be fine in the summer. There is no need for the load limiter at all. That's what happens when the spreadsheet guys are in charge.

Because even where you live, that payment plan can be nullified if the utility company is sold; and the legality of cutting off power is why Bay City installed the "resettable" load limiter. It wasn't so much the device, IMNVHO, but the lack of contact with the customer that killed Mr. Schur.

Yes, the power company is at fault; but it's city-owned, so the city manager's responsibility for this death is obvious.

I hope you're in a position to stay safe this winter. Here in Texas we're not (as I've posted before) secure against hypothermia deaths among our poor or / and our elderly. I'm putting up a lengthy post on an alternative to continuing our national practice of leaving our utilities at the mercy of Enron and similar enterprises.