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Sheriff pummels 15 year-old girl

Davidson's picture

Seattle P-I:

The sheriff's lawyer did not want the following video released because "it doesn't tell the whole story." Read the whole article and it'll paint a clear picture of this monster.

NOTE: If the video is unavailable just click the Seattle P-I link and it should work.

The video shows [Sheriff] Schene and Brunner as they escorted the girl into the holding cell. Schene had asked her to remove her basketball shoes, and, as she slipped out of her left shoe, she appeared to kick it at Schene.

Schene then lunged through the door and kicked her, striking either her stomach or upper thigh area, court documents say. He pushed her against a corner wall before flinging her to the floor by her hair. He then squatted down on her and made "two overhead strikes," although it's unclear where the blows landed.

The detective who reviewed the video said it appeared Schene and Brunner had the girl under control when Schene struck her. Schene, who is 6 feet 2 and weighs 195 pounds, did not explain his action to investigators, court documents say.

He and the girl exchanged words. Brunner said she was "real lippy" after being informed she was under arrest and called them "fat pigs."

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Salmo's picture
Submitted by Salmo on

I looked at the post, and I agree that Officer Brunner is going to have a hard time defending himself against the charges that certainly should be brought. Regardless of the criminal trial results, his career in law enforcement should be over.

I was struck by two points in the article. First, the area Brunner covers seems to have a lot of police brutality charges. It seems to me to be worth thinking about the role of leadership, of recruitment (i.e. does a brutal area attract people inclined use unreasonable force to the police force), and the corrosion of an officer's soul from daily contact with the worst sort of human acts. Second, I wonder if whatever it is in his soul that allowed him to brutalize that girl is treatable after he is off the force.

I have a lot of contact with the local police force, but for purposes of this discussion the important interaction is the times late at night when "detail" officers I have hired to provide security have nothing to do and talk about their jobs. This is a rural area. Bye and large, we have little crime and if a criminal is caught doing something like a robbery, he better hope the cops get there soon because almost everyone is going to have a gun or two around the house and they might get nervous. I have neighbors whose 100+ year old houses have never been locked. So, we have a small force and it focuses on the really despicable stuff: child abuse, domestic abuse, intra-family violence up to and including a surprising number of murders, drug abuse, etc. In short, a lot of the stories they tell about the job range from scummy to appalling. The sense that this corrodes their humanity, their soul, is inescapable.

"Choose your enemies wisely, you are going to become just like them" is ascribed to the Chinese, but it applies here too. The symptoms I see aren't tracked, they may not even be reliably trackable. I have more freedom about assignments than the Chief does, but he knows why there are some officers who I will not have working for me. That's a terrible thing too. I don't think that we know how to treat it, and I know that we don't treat it here. Cops aren't knights in shinning armor, but they are public servants and where that service damages them, before they act like Brunner did, we ought to have a remedy.

Damon's picture
Submitted by Damon on

You know, I tried to keep myself from watching this, because I knew it'd piss me off to no end. Well, this time was certainly no exception. Don't these dummies know that besides being totally immoral that this kind of treatment makes it even harder for good cops to do their work?

If he can't take a verbal pummeling from a 15-year-old girl (if that accusation is even true), then he doesn't need to be in the force. Period. There was no justification or excuse for this.