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Sense of impending doom...

That would be the $100 co-pay....

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amberglow's picture
Submitted by amberglow on

it's so wrong -- and inexplicable, too -- that doctors so often see it as a man thing, and pay attention to male hearts (and heart health, like with stress tests, etc) so much more than women's.

i hear misdiagnosing them in women when they happen (as strokes or palpitations or anxiety attacks or other things) is really common still.

I hope she went to the ER, regardless of insurance.

gqmartinez's picture
Submitted by gqmartinez on

is learning to correct these misdiagnoses. Its easy to blame doctors for incompetence or deliberate malfeasance, but that isn't often the case. A lot of diagnoses are based on experience and statistics. When you have no centralized way to look at misdiagnoses to look for patterns, it is hard to recognize real problems and look for them in future diagnoses. Historic differences in delivery of care between men and women may lead to some problems and many of those problems can be addressed with better tracking of misdiagnoses.

I hope I didn't distract from the main point of the post too much.

Iphie's picture
Submitted by Iphie on

AKA "broken heart syndrome" mimics a heart attack, but isn't -- it is often brought on by intense emotional stress (like say, the death of a loved one, which is why it's called broken heart syndrome), and overwhelmingly affects middle-aged and elderly women.

Each of the subjects, who were screened in a hospital, had heart attack symptoms -- chest pain and shortness of breath. Some had to be put on life support to keep their blood circulating.

All had experienced an emotional jolt. One woman watched her mother die at the hospital. Another had been in a car accident, but was otherwise unscathed. One woman was startled at a surprise birthday party.

I remember at the time this study was published reading about a woman who had stress cardiomyopathy the week before her daughter was married, the stress of the preparations and it being an emotionally charged event in general was enough to trigger the attack. $100 co-pays could certainly compound an already stressful time.

I should probably go post this over at Susie's.

splashy9's picture
Submitted by splashy9 on

In the article some died from it when not treated properly.

Too much stress, causing a flood of stress hormones, can kill anyone.

Wonder why women in their 60's get it more...strange.