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Politico: let's you and him fight

DCblogger's picture

Politico has a whole column devoted to promoted division within the Democratic caucus, here is the health care portion

Where to start with the Democratic infighting on health care?

They’ve got problems from the left, caution from deficit hawks in the center and potential turf issues in the Senate.

The group Health Care for America Now, which advocates affordable health care for all, achieved its main success in winning support from fiscally conservative Democrats such as Warner during the campaign season, pushing Democratic candidates to back a health care plan that is universal but not
mandatory.

But the biggest fault lines on health care come from the left in this Democratic fight.

Richard Kirsch, the national campaign manager for Health Care for America Now, foresees trouble from a group of 90 more-liberal House Democrats who want a European-style, single-payer health care system that is part of a bill advocated by Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.).

“The 90 on the left who have signed on to the single-payer Conyers bill — that’s a very active, single-payer group, and we do need to unite them,” Kirsch said.

Health care advocates such as Kirsch also worry that there’s a cautious mindset among Democrats in Congress who have always feared the label “socialized medicine” and have never really envisioned a muscular majority that could actually take a serious crack at health care reform.

“The real challenge is whether Democratic members and staff — who have spent many years only being able to think small — will be able to understand this election is about change in a real way,” Kirsch said. “Some have talked about a very incremental approach. This is not an incremental moment.”

On top of that, turf issues are already brewing in the Senate, where Democratic Sens. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, Max Baucus of Montana and Ron Wyden of Oregon have all released competing plans for universal health care.

Actually it is 93 members. As for HCAN't, let us take our cues from Conyers and Katie Robbins, it may be possible for them to co-opt HCAN't rather than the other way around.

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amberglow's picture
Submitted by amberglow on

the majority of Americans want true universal single-payer.

it's not a "left" or "liberal" position.

Damon's picture
Submitted by Damon on

But they also take a pot-shot at the proposal by labeling it "European-style", which is always a very sure way to tell a writers stance on the issue.

“The real challenge is whether Democratic members and staff — who have spent many years only being able to think small — will be able to understand this election is about change in a real way,” Kirsch said.

Well, I'm glad Mr. Kirsch saw the election this way, but he's got quite a few people to convince that they voted for real change, which is ridiculously ironic.