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Please read BooMan

So I don't have to. I skipped to the end:

He must create a national health care system that fundamentally changes the contours of debate in this country by moving it far to the left.

Yes, and taking single payer off the table is certainly the way to do that!

NOTE Via TalkLeft.

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Submitted by hipparchia on

and what part of the country does he live in?

here in the south at least, the exodus, moderate republicans leaving their party and becoming [nominal] democrats, started around the time of gingrich's contract on america. the republicans had been wooing southern socially conservative [ok, barking moonbat crazy] democrats starting with reagan but newtie was kind of the tipping point.

dunno about the clintons [architects of the third way as far as i can tell] and arkansas, but back in the day, here in this part of the south, if you wanted to be in politics and get anywhere, you joined the democratic party, no matter how conservative or liberal you were on any given issue. same for chicago politics for a long time, including when obama started there.

obama used a lot of pretty words to woo lefties to vote for the party that has largely been taken over by expat moderate republicans.

Submitted by lambert on

[rimshot, laughter]

BooMan is from Philly. I'm not sure of his age, but I'd guess under 50 (too lazy to Google for his bio).

Well said. (Actually, I think it could be a lot worse than taken over by expat moderate republicans...)

Submitted by hipparchia on

well, he's got a wife and a dog, so i guess he's older than 11 after all.

so, not from the south, and maybe or maybe not old enough to have been personally observing politics [or more narrowly, political affiliations] starting pre-reagan. i was just curious, no real reason to look it up [i googled briefly, since you mentioned it; love his dog].

i wouldn't mind there being a major party of moderate former republicans, and they can even have the democratic party if they want it, name and all. i wouldn't mind if the rest of us had a social democrat party, or democratic socialist party, or a democratic farmer labor party [i kind of like that one], or ...

i wouldn't be averse to the two major parties cracking up and regrouping as 4 or 5 smaller parties either, although my personal preference is for more independents [a la bernie sanders, not joe lieberman, of course].

ElizabethF's picture
Submitted by ElizabethF on

was the deeeeep discussion about the third way.

What's the definition of third way? Centrism (DLC)

Third Way

Need to process this a little. I like political conflict.

vastleft's picture
Submitted by vastleft on

http://www.correntewire.com/triangulatio...

Why is it that Barack Obama’s rhetoric sounds so strangely familiar?

Oh, I remember. There was this charming young fellow from Arkansas – what was the name of that town? Anyway, he had this awfully nice idea, about a “third way” alternative to right-left partisanship. I wonder what became of him and that darling wife of his...

ElizabethF's picture
Submitted by ElizabethF on

That was a great post. Wish I had read it way back then.

I never thought about of Hillary the centrist or third way. Bill Clinton also. I knew DLC and they were co founders but ....I think Hillary would have done it differently. She might have explained us to death but I just don't think she would be so sneaky about it.
That's how I see it anyway.

I could probably go more to the right on some issues. Just not all of them.

vastleft's picture
Submitted by vastleft on

Over Obama was substantially based on her increasing partisanship as the campaign wore on and Obama's constant embrace of that hideously untimely bipartisanship doctrine.

In any case, it's laughable that Obama was celebrated endlessly as an antidote to the compromising Clintons, DLC, etc., when his obsequieousness toward the right wing is far more pronounced and much more needless and ill-timed than Bill's.

Submitted by Paul_Lukasiak on

...Booman's biggest false assumption is that success in governance translates into continued power.

But the country changes the party in the White House for "no good reason" almost as often as it changes it because of "failure". Eisenhower wasn't considered a failure, but Kennedy was elected. GWH Bush wasn't considered a failure (although the economy was a problem for his re-election), but Clinton was elected. And Clinton himself continued to get high numbers for his governance -- yet Gore lost.
_