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ObamaCare Clusterfuck Advertising: A New Low: "Pajama Boy"

Rainbow Girl's picture

Is there a word in the English language for "beyond desperate," other than pathetic?

If this is what an American Young Invincible looks like, yikes. I don't think he would have made the cut to join the Army of Sparta.

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jo6pac's picture
Submitted by jo6pac on

would have been better if he was in his parents basement staring at a computer screen with bunny slippers on. You know like those smelly bloggers that are always picking on him;)

Submitted by Dromaius on

That face is going to make ME wanna buy insurance.

Rainbow Girl's picture
Submitted by Rainbow Girl on

Reminds me of the Seinfeld episode.

George -- the permanently unemployed upper west side flaneur and dreamer -- has been living in sweatpants, wearing them not just in his apartment, but out in the city, on the streets and at the diner until Gerry finally says something:

"Enough with the sweatpants already."

I guess Young Invincible is not the same as Jobs Creator or Master of the Universe.

quixote's picture
Submitted by quixote on

What's even the idea behind this dreck? Isn't the point with ads that you think, "Ooh, I wanna be him and get the car / cologne / burger / ... insurance??" Nobody, not even the guy in the ad, wants to be like that. So, um, whuuut?

Or is it just that these young folks are getting too meta for me?

Submitted by lambert on

"Man, I'm seein' that kid on the couch and I want to slap him around and he won't even buy insurance!

Which is why, if I knew the font, I'd add "Mom, what about the narrow networks?" and so forth.

"Mom, that network is as narrow as your mind!"

Submitted by Dromaius on

Maybe the idea the Marketeers are trying to nurture in the parents is that insurance will speed him on the road to a cure from his bad-pajama bad-sweater psychoses? Then finally, maybe, he'll move out and they'll be able to commence the pretence of sadness about their empty nester status.

Submitted by lambert on

Let's not smack the kid around -- it's his Mom who's pressuring him to buy junk insurance.

Rainbow Girl's picture
Submitted by Rainbow Girl on

Yep. I like the "smart kid" subtitles on both posters.

Notorious P.A.T.'s picture
Submitted by Notorious P.A.T. on

"If this is what an American Young Invincible looks like, yikes. I don't think he would have made the cut to join the Army of Sparta."

What is that supposed to mean? Would YOU have made it into the Spartan army, Rainbow Girl?

I thought Correntewire was a place for analyzing politics, not making fun of people's looks. Was I wrong?

Submitted by Dromaius on

RainbowGirl, as far as I know, has never appeared in an Obamacare ad representing a "young invincible". This person has. Thus, criticism of whether he properly represents what the marketers are trying to convey, is warranted. Criticizing RainbowGirl personally is not.

Now, really, in your heart of hearts, does he look invincible?

And yes, this is political talk because these are political ads. Their purpose is to sell something political.

And really, the ad itself makes fun of his looks. How many young adults do you know who hang out at home in onesies?

Maybe you're taking her comments a little too seriously. Do you think?

Notorious P.A.T.'s picture
Submitted by Notorious P.A.T. on

"Now, really, in your heart of hearts, does he look invincible?"

I don't give a single solitary shit what he looks like. What the people in Obamacare advertisements look like doesn't matter an iota to me. Who cares about things like that?

Rainbow Girl's picture
Submitted by Rainbow Girl on

"Who cares about things like that?"

The White House and the outfit that made and deployed these ads. Nothing in advertising is accidental. So these ads provide interesting insight into who Obama thinks the "Young Invincibles" are. "Caring" and "Taking Note" are two different things.

Submitted by Dromaius on

The Obama marketeers are hoping you're alone in this anti-passion. What Pajama boy looks like is the whole point of the ad, in case you hadn't caught on to that.

But bully for you. Carry on.

Submitted by lambert on

I don't have kids. I do see a lot of students and grad students and young adults, even if we are a bit thin on the ground up here, and this kid's "fashion look" is unknown to me. I literally cannot be sure what the advertisers are trying to convey.

I admit, my initial impulse was to say "What a sense of entitlement!" and smack him around, but I'm guessing that's exactly what the advertisers want me to think, but I can't prove that, because I don't really have a sense of the semiotics.

So, ya know, strategic hate management once again.