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The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which is doing a pretty good job of covering gas-drilling issues around here, prints a story on the firing of a "conservative" radio talk-show host at the apparent behest of the shale drilling interests. Yesterday's drilling story featured a registered Republican who's made a name for himself raising hell about the drilling going on in Washington county. Now this. If the corporatists keep stomping us hard enough, will people wake up to the futility of the "left" versus "right" quarrels fomented by the culture warriors? It's not left versus right, it's up versus down.

In case you don't make it as far as page three, there's this sweet tidbit on the "nice sponsors" for a recent addition to the station's lineup:

Just a month before Mr. Foltz's hosting ended, the station began airing a weekly, two-hour show called "Natural Gas Matters" on Fridays in the slot following the show Mr. Foltz used to host. The show answers listeners' questions about Marcellus drilling. Its major sponsors are McDonald Land Services, which surveys land for drilling companies, and National Brokerage, a financial services firm that helps landowners manage leases.

The show's hosts "talk about the positive impact of natural gas, the jobs it creates," Mr. Mroziak said. "They let people know what they can do with their newfound wells."

On the first episode of "Natural Gas Matters," host Jason Miller said, "We're pro-industry. Just so you know. [Co-host] Chris and I are pro-industry," according to online audio files of the show.

"We both get paychecks from gas companies," explained Chris Whinery, the show's other host.

Mr. Mroziak says the show is a moneymaker, popular with those who fund it as well as listeners. "We have a lot of nice sponsors lined up for the show." He declined to say how much revenue it brings in for the station.

Mr. Foltz's show often addressed potential environmental and health effects of the drilling prevalent in Fayette County.

Comments

Submitted by PA_Lady on

How wonderful that the station is so open and honest about the fact that they are bought and paid for by the gas industry!

Chesapeake has a new ad campaign up here in the Northern Tier (and possibly elsewhere) -- showing bucolic little towns and farms as local people who work for them tell us what a wonderful, nice, and caring neighbor and employer Chesapeake is. [gag]

In the one I saw yesterday, the film must have been shot at 6am on a Sunday, because it shows almost no traffic at the main intersection of the town of Troy. Now, from 7am-8pm M-Sat, that intersection is so congested with gas industry vehicles that it takes about 25 minutes to get through town (we're talking ~2 miles). And, of course, the rolling hills and grassy fields.... those would be the places Chesapeake and its ilk haven't been.