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In the garden: Squash catching up with themselves

I hope! (It's very very hot in that patch, so the plants are panting; in the evening, the leaves will unwilt.)

Look! A squash blossom!

So I may get some squash after all, exactly as I got a flourishing "living fence" from my raspberry patch after worrying that I killed it. I should really be less bearish, or, thanks to nippersdad, bearish only in the eating of honey!

Next comes the contruction of a trellis with U-Hoops and green garden thread, so the squash have something to climb on, like the cukes!

NOTE Bad lambert for not covering that newspaper with straw, but the squash don't seem to mind. I laid those stakes down there because when I removed the killer, not fully cooked, seafood compost that killed the first generation of squash, I had to put it somewhere, and I was too lazy to dig a trench, and anyhow my new spade had not yet arrived, so I shoved all the compost aside, mulched it with bags of leaves I'd had banking the house, and laid down newspaper and straw on top of it. But it was a very blowy few days, and so I laid down the stakes... And I'm kinda like a "Leave it lay where Jesus flang it" guy. Flannery O'Connor said that, I think. Maybe I'll take those stakes up and use them for something. Can't just leave them to rot, that's too third world! And on a completely random note, my coffee tasted slightly of salt because I didn't rinse the saucepan properly after boiling salted water in it to cleanse my sinuses with the neti pot, successfully I might add. And who in their right mind would rinse water out of a pot with more water?

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Submitted by Dromaius on

I would water them more. They'll come back in the evening without it, yes, but if they have sufficient water, they won't do this, or will do it much less. They are preserving the water that they have for stems and fruit rather than leaves, which means they likely aren't doing as good of photosynthesis as they could. This will compromise growth.

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Submitted by Andre on

I would water them more too. My broccoli sometimes looks like them, and when I see it I turn on the soaker for a half hour and they perk right up. I think of that look as the same as a human with his/her tongue hanging out "I'm thirsty". I always wonder if it is possible to over water plants. Some plants like daylillies maybe not. I know of a pond the next town over which has a full, large siberian iris clump sitting fully, right in the water and it blooms every year. Those are zuchini's I take it?

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Submitted by Andre on

Not to brag, my expertise is sorely lacking, but I still have one Butternut squash left over form last Fall. My brother, an long standing avid gardener, suggested I leave them out in the sun, right on the lawn for several days, which I did for ten days last Oct, turning them all around and over so that they got fully hardened by the sun. But I'm giving it the eye right now, since this years now are bearing fruit.

Submitted by lambert on

Your brother was quite right! (How do you tell the skin is hard enough without cutting it?)

I am much better at growing than I am at storing or even eating. I prefer to give most of mine away. This year, however, I have the use of a friend's root cellar.

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Submitted by Andre on

I peeled that nine month old butternut last night. The flesh was sopping wet. Kind of amazing. I kept it in the basement where it's very dry (which we seem to agree is most important for storage), and every so often I would gently press on it all around with my thumb, looking for soft spots. If I found one (that spot would probably have to be composted), I would immediately peel it. Had that happen a couple of years ago with one of my other brother's butternuts. Here's the recipein whixch I'm going to use last night's squash.

Submitted by lambert on

I've always had very good yield, so I am not worrying too much. I always figured it incentivized them to sink their roots deeper! Still, this area is hotter than usual.