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Ian Welsh on Netroots Nation

No triumphalism here:

[L]ast week, in Vegas, I found a Netroots that is more divided than I’ve ever seen it in its short existence. I think, contrary to what the “realists” [vs. the "purists"] might say that this isn’t entirely bad. It is a real split, over real issues, and thrashing it out is worth the pain, because until we do, we won’t know what it really means to be a modern Netroots liberal or progressive: what our bedrock values are, and what we’re fighting for.

Personally, I think the only "realism" is to save yourself, because the career "progressives" would throw their own grandmothers under the bus for a teleconference slot with the Big O, but YMMV.

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madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

I'm not sure I agree with Ian's assessment here:

It is a real split, over real issues, and thrashing it out is worth the pain, because until we do, we won’t know what it really means to be a modern Netroots liberal or progressive: what our bedrock values are, and what we’re fighting for.

No, it's a split between stupid racist fat old white women and super-smart kewl male progressives who drink PBR. Kos told me so. Neener neener.

;-)

basement angel's picture
Submitted by basement angel on

I was trying so hard to remember that word this morning. I was sick and I couldn't get out of bed, and was wracking my brain trying to remember it. LOL

Thank you.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

It's very important that said racist stupid fat old white women be bitter as well. That came right from Obama's mouth. ;-)

Submitted by lambert on

2008-04-16. The focus of this complex of talking points has always been on the emotion, "bitter." But I think that the "cling to" is even more insidious and corrosive, since it denied moral agency to non-Obama voters. It was the first sign that the working class would be thrown under the bus by the faction that seized control of the Ds -- though I have to admit I wasn't nearly cynical enough about the consequences, which turned out to be horrific.

madamab's picture
Submitted by madamab on

After the BitterCling scandal, the word "Bitter" was later applied more to women; therefore, it stings a bit more for me personally. The word takes our justified rage at being proclaimed second-class citizens by the patriarchy (and specifically at the misogyny of the Obama campaign towards Hillary Clinton), and turns it into something impotent and risible. "Bitter" people don't do anything but bitch, moan and possibly knit. They're nothing; they can be cast aside without any repercussions.

And Ms. Magazine claimed he was a feminist AFTER that remark.

No one was cynical enough, Lambert. No one could have imagined that he was going to let the Gulf Coast drown in a sea of toxic oil and gas while pondering deep issues like whether or not to visit his wife on her Spanish vacation.

He is the worst President Ever, beating Bush in less than two years. Who says he can't get things done?

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

But, yeah, for me, the "bitter" was worst. People have perfectly sound psychological reasons for clinging to stuff, like security blankets or bad relationships.

The "bitter" implies that those people who were mad at Obama, had no reason to be, and that just pisses me off.

votermom's picture
Submitted by votermom on

this summer (knitting a market bag right now), so I can actually say: "Je suis une tricoteuse amère".

votermom's picture
Submitted by votermom on

"s'accrochant"

Bitter knitters clinging to their guns and religion is "Tricoteuses amère accrochés à leurs fusils et de la religion."

a little night musing's picture
Submitted by a little night ... on

"Tricoteuses amères qui s'accrochent à leurs fusils et à la religion"

"Accrochées à" seems to suggest that they are "hooked", whereas "S'accrochent à" suggests that they are "hooking themselves to".

Nice parallel with knitting. (I'm a crocheter, myself. And I'm way overdue for an update on that post.)