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Highly Enriched Stupid

okanogen's picture

A thousand monkeys, stabbing at keys since the invention of the typewriter, could never come up with a sentence as tongue-floppingly dumb as this one found in comments here:

As for the public input, that was already taken care of in 1849, if you weren't there, then shut your yap!

The topic is in regard to a public land-swap scheme that would transfer 86,000 acres of state land inside the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) to federal land, in exchange for federal lands in the Superior National Forest. The bait is to get federal funding for schools, but a little-discussed provision in the House bill specifically prohibits this additional funding (i.e. you don't get the reach-around, northern Minnesota). So what is the switch?


The hugely controversial Polymet open pit sulfide mine right outside the BWCA, of course, which is languishing due to adverse federal reviews and other federal oversight. Removing the mine from impacting US Forest Service federal lands by transferring them to state ownership would remove much of the federal regulation and oversight requirements for open pit mining, and with the region desperate for jobs, local pols are more "persuadable". Actually, for the most part, Dems and Republicans alike are falling all over themselves hoping to make this trainwreck (spearheaded by a shadowy, matryoshka doll-styled Canadian penny stock entity based in Vancouver, BC) a reality. Although not all Dems are on the bandwagon....

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lizpolaris's picture
Submitted by lizpolaris on

Clearly no one alive today was also alive in 1849 so the statement is meant as satire.

Thanks for bringing this here - I'll pass along to my MN friends, sounds awful.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

Here is the entire comment:

The editor is dead wrong here. The lands were set aside in 1849 for production of income for schools, and there is nothing more to be said about it. Logging and mining provides more private sector income for the schools than any other rediculous recirculation of additional tax dollars so packsackers can sit back and adore the flora, fauna and trees without contributing a nickel out of their backpockets, expecting those of us who choose not to give more for their exclusive enjoyment. The Range DFL delegation and the DFL Governor agree and are dead right on this issue. Thank you very much Congressman Cravaack, you are the best Congressman the 8th has ever had and probably ever will.

As for the public input, that was already taken care of in 1849, if you weren't there, then shut your yap!

lizpolaris's picture
Submitted by lizpolaris on

The idea the lands were set aside for the production of income for schools in 1849 is completely idiotic. Just fyi. The entire comment is satire. It's a very dry (black) humor in the Midwest. You might check out Prairie Home Companion.

okanogen's picture
Submitted by okanogen on

So, I knoooowwwww.....

But you are wrong. This is an archtypical "northern Minnesota STFU Twin Cities treehuggers" comment. It's true that logging and mining provide more income to the local economy than tourism (even hunting and fishing), that is why they put that in the comment, but the mining there has till now been iron mining which is far different from sulfide mining and that is where the battle of obscuring the difference is going on.

Submitted by lambert on

Official corruption enabling resource extraction and environmental destruction.