Corrente

If you have "no place to go," come here!

Diamond geezer

Was, and still should be. R.I.P. Joe Strummer, d. December 22, 2002.

More below the fold:

Career Opportunities ("And I won’t open letter bombs for you")

Brand New Cadillac ("I said, Jesus Christ! Where'd you get that Cadillac?"*)

Guns of Brixton

Complete Control ("Lemme see your other hand!")

"Manchester Suite" (sound not so good, but what footage!)

English Civil War ("Your face was blue in the light of the screen")

Straight to Hell, very strange...("As railhead towns feel the steel mills rust")

Know Your Rights ("You have the right to food money")

Happy Holidays!

NOTE * Talkin' 'bout you, Ezra!

NOTE Yeah, yeah, "guitar heavy"...

0
No votes yet

Comments

Submitted by [Please enter a... (not verified) on

the guy was in some "English punk band called the Clash." Per wiki.

I had to google him, had never heard the name. The whole punk thing went completely by me.

/hangs head in ignorant shame.

if only because joe would never have held it against you - that's the sort of guy he was.

he is one of maybe two or three truly revolutionary rock and roll musicians of the past 30 years. ani difranco is probably one of the other two.

joe put up where others just talked. he was never insincere, and it was effortless. when you saw him perform live - he gave everything he had. everything. he was like a man possessed. less like, say bruce, more like jerry lee. a true old school rock and roll wild man. he never had any pretensions whatsoever. he got branded a marxist, among other things, when all he ever did was ask inconvenient questions.

i ain't never had no heroes, but he came pretty damn close.

Submitted by [Please enter a... (not verified) on

i like Strummers old 101ers Elgin Ave (pre Clash) R&B / Rockabilly and Reagae roots stuff (the sorta pre "punk") which all made it into the Clash but still. I like it... now, better, i think.

*

Submitted by lambert on

But for me they didn't have the depth that the Clash do. Textures, depth of influence, lyrics, interplay, beautiful chaos, speed, tightness and sloppiness .... Maybe YouTube doesn't have the right songs. Anyhow, I remembered your comment on the 101ers, which is why I put that video first.

I saw the Clash once in 1979 at the Harvard Square Theatre in Cambridge, MA, which was the kind of tiny theatre with hip ticketsellers and sticky floors and bad seats that used to be, before the chains came in. It was the best rock concert I've ever been to, bar none; every song a smashed sonic jewel. Being there was like being inside the gears of a giant piece of earth-moving machinery, except the earth was sound and the machine was driven up to the very edge of control by operators who were at once passionate, incredibly competent, incredibly cool, totally committed, and tiny, skinny little Brits in tight pants with bad teeth.

The seats were too crowded and dangerous to stand up and dance on, so we all pogoed sitting down, and the whole building was shaking in rhythm because the seats were all screwed to the floor. After a few years, I realized it had been the last rock concert I'd been to, but that didn't matter, really. Why go to another one?

We. Are. Going. To. Die. We must restore hope in the world. We must bring forth a new way of living that can sustain the world. Or else it is not just us who will die but everyone. What have we got to lose? Go forth and Fight!—Xan

vastleft's picture
Submitted by vastleft on

After the near-riot at the Chaka Khan concert that preceded it, I begged off working the now-legendary Clash show.

For whatever reason, The Clash just didn't speak to me, the same way The Boss and U2 don't. I don't disrespect them, I just don't connect with 'em. Music is funny that way.

But "tiny"? I recall the HST as being pretty good sized, before they chopped it up into a cineplex.

There were all kinds of catacombs, a catwalk I was too afraid to go out on, and a balcony that was pretty much always off-limits, full of broken wicker chairs. And sticky, yes, very sticky.

Submitted by lambert on

I mean, what in Harvard Square is big? But perhaps I think of it as tiny in comparison to a concert hall. Certainly it was smaller than the equivalent movie theatre up the Red Line in Somerville (I forget the name).

I connected to the Clash through reggae: They were the only white band that seemed to be able to play it like it was real music, instead of a fad. Also, they could really play their instruments (which is why I never did connect with the punk movement as a whole, at least as far as buying... well... their "records" (as we called the delivery medium of choice back then, kids)).

We. Are. Going. To. Die. We must restore hope in the world. We must bring forth a new way of living that can sustain the world. Or else it is not just us who will die but everyone. What have we got to lose? Go forth and Fight!—Xan

vastleft's picture
Submitted by vastleft on

... and so was their record department (world's largest at the time, or so I was told), another place I worked back then. I was pretty shocked one day to find they didn't sell music of any kind anymore.

The theater in Somerville is... ta-da, The Somerville Theatre.

Submitted by lambert on

Open the Input format triangle, select the Full HTML radio button, paste in all the Object tag stuff in the YouTube embed box, click Post Comment.

We. Are. Going. To. Die. We must restore hope in the world. We must bring forth a new way of living that can sustain the world. Or else it is not just us who will die but everyone. What have we got to lose? Go forth and Fight!—Xan

I saw the Clash once in 1979 at the Harvard Square Theatre in Cambridge, MA

this little gem of writing makes me think of you in a whole new light lambert - ever consider rock journalism? you're better than about 2/3rds of the arrogant ponces writing for pitchfork.

what was it about the clash that somehow inspired one to wax poetic? they had poets' souls, or at least joe did. and paul is sexier than monty clift and paul newman put together.