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Common household remedies request

Actually, this is more a report than a request!

1. I just got one of those mini-greenhouse thingies, with the peat pots and the plastic covers, to start a couple of packets of hot peppers. The directions say, "place seed starting tray in a very warm spot, both night and day," so I put the greenhouse over the wood stove. Is that too hot, do you think?

2. I'm winterseeding with milk jugs out in the garden, but the winterseeding concept assumes, like, snow and freezing weather, and this spring has been bizarrely warm and rainy. I checked the soil in one of the jugs today, and it was damp. No standing water in the jugs, which is a mercy, but the soil is cold and damp. Does anybody know if I need to worry about this?

3. And then there's the critter under the house. So far, no sign of life. Of course, if I got a dog, I wouldn't have woodchucks (not to imply, please gawd, no, that the critter under the house is a woodchuck). But I don't like dogs. If only a vicious barn cat could take on woodchucks! But somehow, I don't think so. And if I ever wanted chickens...

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Valley Girl's picture
Submitted by Valley Girl on

1) how far above the wood stove? I mean, details are important. (not that I'd have an answer, except I'd say get a thermometer and check the peat temp)

3) Huh? If there is no sign of life, how do know there's a critter there? A really bad smell? Really, I can't help unless you are more specific. Please elaborate about this critter and why (as you seem to imply) this is a bad thing.

BTW, ygm about sumpin.

Submitted by lambert on

1. I placed two red bricks on the stove, then a board on the bricks, and then placed the mini-greenhouse on the board.

3. My electrician said there was scat. If this critter is a woodchuck, that's bad, since it can destroy my garden in a day. We have a woodchuck problem in this town...

Submitted by hipparchia on

you're stuck with all the woodland critters then. dogs might or might not chase away deer and badgers and woodchucks and possums and skunks and whatever, but cats definitely won't.

then again, maybe you could encourage a family of coyotes to take up residence in your area, always assuming you don't plan to have chickens or outdoor cats.

it looks like pepper seeds like soil temperatures in the range of 68-86 degrees, with 77 being about the optimum for highest percentage of seeds germinating.

Valley Girl's picture
Submitted by Valley Girl on

I know it's not good form to make fun of Lambert, our gracious host, but obviously he's not a SCIENTIST, albeit a very fine writer, etc. etc.

Uh,

1. I just got one of those mini-greenhouse thingies, with the peat pots and the plastic covers, to start a couple of packets of hot peppers. The directions say, "place seed starting tray in a very warm spot, both night and day," so I put the greenhouse over the wood stove. Is that too hot, do you think?

Oh, hi Lambert! *g*

Submitted by hipparchia on

ex-scientist, really, having been strictly a computer geek for the last decade or so, but other than having used beaucoup statistics to analyze plant distributions for an ecology class eons ago, i know almost nothing about them. my idea of gardening and landscaping is to hire a kid with a lawnmower if the weeds get tall enough for the dog to hide in.

Submitted by lambert on

and the board between the stove and the mini-greenhouse will make sure that the temperature doesn't change too rapidly (more from the ambient air).

Valley Girl's picture
Submitted by Valley Girl on

I mean I am laughing, assuming I got the subtext correct on your quote beginning "The law, in its...."

Touche.

Submitted by lambert on

No, the "law" quote was for elsewhere, had two comments open at once...

sisterkenney's picture
Submitted by sisterkenney on

From The Detroit Free Press 2/26:
? WARNING FOR PET OWNERS: Roseville officials are advising residents with small animals and pets to keep them indoors because foxes and coyotes have been seen in the city.

Submitted by hipparchia on

REALLY BIG kitties

Submitted by hipparchia on

i missed that. i wasn't keeping up with the subtitles very well. watching the critters instead.

Submitted by jawbone on

house (it really did house goats at one time and still smelled of their presence, but had become the garden shed). They had a big, friendly yellow lab, as well.

All seemed to coexist quite well, and the woodchucks feasted on buds, flowering plants, and other plantings. They were very happy; had been there for decades, generation upon generation....

So, having a dog is not a guarantee of no woodchucks, it seems.

Perhaps a Siberian or Norwegian Forest Cat might do the job -- they're known for hunting skills and ability to jump great heights. And beautiful.

Submitted by lambert on

That electric fence looks really interesting. And it's not expensive. I think I'm going to go pace my garden, see how much fence I'd need. It's as cheap as a trap, really.

chicago dyke's picture
Submitted by chicago dyke on

i'm pretty sure a woodchuck is the reason our old cat had to be put down after we found half her tail ripped off one day. cats love to be outdoors, but my babies are never allowed. foxes and coyotes also worry me, as a cat owner, not to mention cars and disease. i'd try spreading some predator piss around the areas where you found the scat.

be careful with those pots on the stove, that's all i can say. playing with fire is...you know, playing with fire. i've never tried what you're doing and i'm not sure i would.

i've seen winter seeding in jugs work at other garden blogs, but i've never tried it. good luck and let us know your results.

Monkeyfister's picture
Submitted by Monkeyfister on

... to germinate. Buy a seedling heating pad with a temp control.

I have my pad and lights set up on a 12/12 cycle. It simulates nature pretty well.

--mf

uni.mo's picture
Submitted by uni.mo on

Cannonfire is gone.

Goodbye

Anybody know what's going on?

Submitted by lambert on

Worth a post...