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Common Household Remedies Request

twig's picture

The washing machine died, so I need a new one. Nothing too fancy, just something that does the laundry, preferably with some sort of water-saving feature. Anyone have one they really like -- or really hate?

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goldberry's picture
Submitted by goldberry on

I'm on a budget so that's where I would look first. But I've found that to really clean clothes well, lots of water is definitely preferred. Either cut back on the load, reduce the water level for small loads and use cold water as much as possible.

Submitted by lambert on

Their bearings don't wear out as fast, because with a top loader the entire weight of the tub goes onto that one bearing.

He also says that everything is now so tightly specified that repairs are inevitable in two or three years.

I'm almost thinking something old fashioned with a wringer would be better!

wuming's picture
Submitted by wuming on

Most of the components are user replaceable if it's an older machine. The mechanical timers usually die first, the motor last.

Submitted by JuliaWilliams on

noted with your machine. When my machine died recently, I did some on-line sleuthing, found a description of the problem, then found a wonderful website that showed the cost ($20) and a detailed pictorial of how to replace the part. Sky Pilot took the repair upon himself (with no appliance repair experience) and fixed it in less than one hour, including taking it apart, and putting it back together. (One neat trick he had was to record the sound it was making, and a pic of the machine to take to the parts store-really helped the staff there ID the part more quickly).

twig's picture
Submitted by twig on

Great ideas, thank you. That might be do-able.

twig's picture
Submitted by twig on

the repair guy quoted $300+ for parts and $200 for labor, so it's roughly the price of a new m/c. Or a whole lot of trips to the laundromat -- ewwwww!!

wuming's picture
Submitted by wuming on

If you are really hard up you can probably find an identical model that is used/broken and strip the parts out of it.

twig's picture
Submitted by twig on

One of the few tv shows I watch is about a guy who does this on all kinds of old stuff -- it's amazing because a lot of older, mostly pre-WWII things can be repaired to be just like new. They're so sturdy to begin with that, even though they weren't necessarily designed to be heirlooms (things like Coke machines and children's toys) they are fixable. And he always does it by cannabilizing other machinery. So that would probably work really well!

quixote's picture
Submitted by quixote on

As Julia said, online sleuthing first. If that gets you nowhere (or to a list of expensive tools you'll have to buy first), then try a Mom and Pop appliance fixing store. (If they have any where you are. Try the working class parts of the closest biggish town.) That's where I found mine. $150 used, refurbed Kenmore that was old when I got it and has been running well for eight years.