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"The British goverment has learned..."

For anybody who came in late, here's why the headline is a joke: Read below the fold...

Occupy Congress

Could bring up happy memories, although I didn't see anyone I knew. Read below the fold...

In the garden: Density

Swaths, tranches of color (here, I admit, mostly green). That's what I'm after. Not a few widely spaced specimens separated by bark mulch. Read below the fold...

And not one bankster went to jail, not one

Brad DeLong:

A year and a half ago, when some of us were expecting a return to whatever the path of potential output was by 2017, our guess was that the Great Recession would wind up costing the North Atlantic in lost production about 80% of one year’s output–call it $13 trillion. Today a five-year return to whatever the new normal might be looks optimistic–and even that scenario carries us to $20 trillion. And a pessimistic scenario of five years that have been like 2012-2014 plus then five years of recovery would get us to a total lost-wealth cost of $35 trillion.

At some point we will have to stop calling this thing “The Great Recession” and start calling it “The Greater Depression”. When?

But what should the banksters go to jail for, you ask? Read below the fold...

Distant sounds of breaking glass

Will Bunch in Philly, still plugging away:

Then something approached, like a gathering storm.

“I heard a distant sound, like a rally of noise and people -- like when people fight, with cheering and jeering, and it seemed far away,” recalled [Richard] Watson, now 68, grey-haired and soft-spoken. “Then I heard breaking glass. Then I heard more breaking glass, and it sounded like it was on my block!

“That’s when I said, ‘Whoa, what’s going on here?’ Then I heard the sirens.”

Read below the fold...

Bill Gates gives Cornell $6.1 million to "depolarize" the GMO debate

Oh, good:

Supported by a $5.6 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Cornell Alliance for Science will help inform decision-makers and consumers through an online information portal and training programs to help researchers and stakeholders effectively communicate the potential impacts of agricultural technology and how such technology works.

The project will involve developing multimedia resources, including videos of farmers from around the world documenting their struggles to deal with pests, diseases, crop failure and the limited resources available in the face of poverty and climate change.

“Proponents and opponents alike speculate whether biotech crops are of benefit to farmers, but rarely are those farmers engaged in the biotech discourse or their voices heard,” said Sarah Evanega, senior associate director of International Programs in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), who will lead the project.

“Our goal is to depolarize the GMO debate and engage with potential partners who may share common values around poverty reduction and sustainable agriculture, but may not be well informed about the potential biotechnology has for solving major agricultural challenges,” Evanega said. “For instance, pro-biotech activists share a lot of the same anti-pesticide, low-input, sustainable-agriculture vision as the organic movement.”

Oh, please. Read below the fold...

Tweet of the day

"NATO: These new satellite images show Russian troops in and around Ukraine"

I like the clickbait-style "These new satellite images," although "These 6 new satellite images" would be more effective. WaPo:

The photos were taken by a company called DigitalGlobe. Based in Longmont, Colo., they take high-resolution satellite photos across the world.

This is bizarre. We're setting up a casus belli with Russia on digital evidence from a private company? Doesn't the government have any satellites? What do they show? Read below the fold...

In the garden: The deer fence at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens

Here it is. I added the big red arrows because in fact the fence is hard to see:

So, eight-foot T-bars stuck in the ground, black netting strung between them. I can live with that if I have too, since the visual destruction would not be too great. And it's much better than some of the massive chickenwire constructions I've seen up here.

Here's the signage, explaining it: Read below the fold...

"English as She Is Spoke"

"Few, few the bird make her nest" is my favorite. Read below the fold...

In the garden: Pollinator wall at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens

(Here is their site. They're in Boothbay Harbor, and open through October 31.) Now here is truly neat idea that I would like very much to steal:

As you can see, this is a wall of flowers; there is a vertical wood frame that supports stacked green metal cages that in their turn enclose and support soil, into which plants have rooted themselves; it's as if somebody grew flowers in flats, and then just positioned the flats vertically, but on a grander scale. (I think the rootballs hold the soil in place so it doesn't spill out). You can also see that the Botanical Gardens have a budget, what with the fancy wood frame, the metal cages, and the nylon cordage holding the cages in place.

Above is the sunny side of the wall; here's a shot of the shady side: Read below the fold...

A $15 an hour minimum wage is a middle-of-the road compromise position (#12p1)

Or would be, in a sane society. Bangor Daily News:

If the minimum wage had kept pace with worker productivity, the minimum wage would be $22 per hour today,” said Asher Platts, chairman of the Maine Green Independent Party and a state Senate candidate. “So where is all that extra value? … Wall Street holdings are the highest they’ve been in decades. This isn’t a recession; this is a robbery.”

There you go. So we're not even asking for justice, let alone shared prosperity, or decreasing the Gini Co-efficient that measures the distance between rich and poor (that is, between capital and labor). Read below the fold...

Medical marijuana saves lives

Bangor Daily News:

Researchers aren’t sure why, but in the 23 states where medical marijuana has been legalized, deaths from opioid overdoses have decreased by almost 25 percent, according to a new analysis.

“Most of the discussion on medical marijuana has been about its effect on individuals in terms of reducing pain or other symptoms,” said lead author Dr. Marcus Bachhuber in an email to Reuters Health. “The unique contribution of our study is the finding that medical marijuana laws and policies may have a broader impact on public health.”

Well, I'm not sure, but I can guess! Read below the fold...

I suppose nine months from now we'll be seeing lots of Maine babies named Skyler

Breaking: Israel Hamas something or other

Check the wild variation in the headlines:

Read below the fold...

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