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"Because Christianists are opposed to Christ" (assuming, arguendo, that he existed)

The Times asks today:

After the 2004 election, evangelical Christians looked like one of the most powerful and cohesive voting blocs in America. Three years later their leadership is split along generational and theological lines. How did it all come apart?

"Because Christianists are opposed to Christ" (assuming, arguendo, that he existed).

This has been another edition of simple answers to simple questions.

As I wrote on the latest Christianist scandal, the abuses of power by the Roberts dynasty:

I’ll give one of the whistleblowers the last word:

Tim Brooker, one of the professors who sued, said he fears for the university’s survival if certain changes aren’t made.

“All over that campus, there are signs up that say, ‘And God said, build me a university, build it on my authority, and build it on the Holy Spirit,’” Brooker said. “Unfortunately, ownership has shifted.”

As it always does. That’s the nature of the Christianist Project. Building institutions in the public square is, exactly, laying up treasures on earth (Matthew 6:19). Which is every Christianist’s right, bless their heart. But they shouldn’t try to kid themselves, or deceive us, that their enterprise is anything more than an power grab to impose their set of tribal so-called “values” on the rest of us. Their enterprise has nothing to do with religion. By definition, it can’t. Which is why Jesus warned against the Pharisees, of whom the Roberts family is but the latest incarnation.

As Laodicea writes:

A secular blogger seems to have a better grasp on the Richard Roberts scandal at Oral Roberts University than the sycophant evangelical followers of this word-faith ministry. Richard Roberts’ first wife, Patti, told of the lavish, ungodly lifestyles of the Roberts family many years ago in her book, Beauty for Ashes. Unfortunately, donors weren’t listening.

That's probably because the donors were giving the money to build a political movement in the hope of gaining earthly power and wealth. The whole scam had nothing to do with God, or the godly. Eh?

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