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Baby Name Emergency!!!

chicago dyke's picture
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Heh, there aren't many better opportunities to Go For It. The Facts: male, my nephews, twins, new on the scene, right around this astrological sign, eastern yurpean, likely pale and blonde, well off, it's still unclear if they'll be raised in any particular "tradition." Very American, in that way. So... names, anyone? Think twin boys. You've got 7 days. Last name starts with "d" and rhymes with "eat." We're shooting for first, or middle. My vote? Berengar. What kid wouldn't want a cool name like that? Second choice/twin #2: Joachim Sebastian. Hokey, but there you go. If you could be called anything, what would it be?

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Submitted by lambert on

I'm an old-fashioned uber-WASP. My vote:

1. James, after James Madison.

2. Benjamin, after Ben Franklin.

Good revolutionaries both, you might notice. Granted, for some definition of good.

basement angel's picture
Submitted by basement angel on

before I named my son is "Xaine" - incredibly cool. If you could find another name besides Xavier, which starts with X, it would totally rock. I also love Hoagland with Hoagie (as in Carmichael) for short.

basement angel's picture
Submitted by basement angel on

Xeven! There's also Xion, Xander and Xowie.

I believe that Thudpucker, in Doonesbury, tried to sneak Feedback and Rimshot past his wife, but it didn't work. Still, some moms might go for it.

I also like Lambert's suggestion as well.

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

And the names we narrowed it down to, were Jaxson and Jacen. Traditonal, but modern.

Middle names are on your own. My advice, since it's who I got my daughter names from, is ask a musician, who gets tempo.

chicago dyke's picture
Submitted by chicago dyke on

in this clan. so X and 'eks' sounding names are Right Out. i'm leaning towards vowels. Idris. Evian. Joachim. Asa. Grayson.

Submitted by PA_Lady on

My sons have the #2 and #1 (respectively) Irish first names and incredibly-common English second names, which go well together and with our German last name. My daughter has a very-girly first name I didn't really like at first, but she chose it herself at 5 days old -- it being the only name on a list to which she would respond. (We had a very difficult time naming her, since we'd only picked out boys' names.) Her second name is a combo of her dad's and my second names. Altogether, none of them are terribly original.

That said, my suggestions are:

Rohan. Rhys. Declan. Liam. Lucien. Eamon. Etienne. Elias. Elian. Gianni.
Tonio (or Antonio). Yves.

mass's picture
Submitted by mass on

myself, but I have a bit longer than y'all do. I'm pretty much putting off name choices because everytime I think of one I like it for like a minute and then I don't anymore. :(

There are some good baby name sites. nameberry.com is good.

Submitted by PA_Lady on

It sounds trite (and it is) but you'll know the right name. You'll hear it or see it, and something will go "ding" -- and you'll find yourself coming back to it over and over again.

With my oldest, what started as a joke led us to the right name. I had 24/7 sickness instead of morning sickness and after yet another horrible day at work, said to my husband, "Whatever this kid is, it's initials are going to be RC for 'Rotten Child.'" Well, after making up funny names like "Roderica Charismatic" and "Rhododendron Califragilistic," we actually hit on a boy's and a girl's name with those initials that we just loved.

With the second son, I thought he was a girl, so no boy's name picked out, and there was no way to make a masculine version of "Samantha Carolinne." My sister had been a huge source of support and encouragement through the various health trials I endured during my pregnancy, so I named him after her -- making him the 4th generation "Pat" (or Patt, in his case), all named after an aunt or uncle.

My daughter's name...we could not come up with anything we liked until literally one hour before I checked out of the hospital. It got so bad that there was a "Name the Baby" contest on the maternity floor and my mom's pulmonary floor. When we read out the names on the list, my daughter turned her head every time that one was said. So, she picked her own name.

One thing to remember is that the second name is not going to be used except on special occasions (like graduation) or when you're yelling at them, so the first and last names should sound good on their own. Speaking of yelling at them: Erma Bombeck used to say before you choose a name, you should yell it out the back door a dozen times at the top of your lungs. If it still sounds good after the 12th time, then go for it. LOL

Good luck and best wishes!

Bryan's picture
Submitted by Bryan on

These boys are going to have to survive middle school and high school, so creative first names can be a problem, given the generally vicious nature of children towards their peers in those environments.

Dull and common are good for male first names, with the creativity saved for middle names. The name used by family members need not be based on either.

There is a good reason so many men in the South use only initials or nicknames, even when they run for office - their parents got creative.

Submitted by PA_Lady on

My mother used to say one should pick out names you'd want the Chief Justice to say when your child was inaugurated as President. Nicknames and "cute" names will happen on their own. But I don't think you should name a child something you think is "dull" or too common. Does the world really need another "John" or "Mary"?

Although, just because a name is common in the country (or the world) doesn't mean it will be where you are. My sons never shared their names with anyone else in their class and rarely with anyone above or below them grade-wise, but Boston would have been another story.

@ mass: Yes to creativity within a common name. My daughter's middle name is Robynne, which is "Robert" and "Yvonne" combined, and carries on a century-long family tradition of giving girls a middle name that ends with "n-n-e."

Submitted by lambert on

Why set your kid up for having their name constantly spelled wrong or mispronounced, or made fun of, or triggering negative, classist and/or racist reactions by job interviewers and other gatekeepers? The issue isn't creativity, as it might be, for a pet.

I'm telling you: James, Benjamin. Or like that.

Submitted by PA_Lady on

My daughter is "Melanie." It's been pronounced Muh-LAY-nee, Muh-lane, Muh-LOH-nee. It's been spelled Melany, Malonie, Melinee/Meliney, Melaine, and Melony.

However, why should parents have to choose names from the dominant ethnic group in order to prevent being classified as not belonging to the dominant ethnic group?

Mind you, I agree that sometimes creative spelling causes more problems than not. My nephew has a classmate whose name is "Suisaiana." I have no idea how to pronounce it. When he says it, it sounds like "Sue-ee-shannah." A friend gets annoyed when people pronounce her daughter's name "Alice" -- it's Alyce, pronounced "Ah-Leece."

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

My sister in law was torn when naming her daughter.

She like Kendra, Alexis, and Michaela, so she decided to blend the three.

Her daughter is named, Makendryia.

Her son, named Preston.

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

My sister in law was torn when naming her daughter.

She like Kendra, Alexia, and Michaela, so she decided to blend the three.

Her daughter is named, Makendryia.

Her son, named Preston.

Submitted by JuliaWilliams on

Study after study has shown the negative effects of "unusual" names, affecting the self-image of the holder, and generating bad feedback from peers, teachers, potential employers, etc. (I still have memories of the first day of school for some of those poor children) Stick with relatively "modern", classic names (naming children after a relative is fine, unless they were named Homer, or Violet, or any of the other "in" names of a century ago). You can't go wrong with good, Latin-based names, IMO. (Although there are some good Greek and Russian ones, too-I'm particularly fond of Vincent, Alexander, Daniel, and Gregory). Just remember to think of what the potential "nickname" and/or "diminutive" might be, also. It ain't easy naming children, now, is it?

Submitted by lambert on

X is what you don't want. You want vowels. I'd try for A, since the As sort to the top.

Aaron, Adam?

Ajax, Achilles?

Allan, Andrew?

Anthony, Alex?

votermom's picture
Submitted by votermom on

because the classic names for those are:

Girl: Denise
Boy: Denephew

(ducks & runs)

On a serious note, how about naming them after people they can look up to? Kids go through a stage where they ask why did you name me ___ and they are mostly very satisfied if you can say, because of (insert positive reason here). Sense of pride.

Also , make sure their initials are either neutral or make up a good word. (Like A.C.E is good, but R.A.T. is not. So much teasing to avoid ...)

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

Are L.M.N.

She thinks its the coolest thing ever(she's nine). It's Layne Madison blah-blah

It rolls of the tongue well, has a good tempo, is unique but not odd enough to get her picked on.

Her nicknames are "L", "L"-Bow, Lil' Bit, "B"(for Bit, I guess, I have no clue where it came from, it just started coming out of her dad's mouth, and stuck. As a matter of a fact, that's just what he does to the two most important girls in his life, abbreviate their names to their first initial. So the kid is "L" and his cat Daisy is "D") & Frog.

votermom's picture
Submitted by votermom on

My daughter has 4 names, and her first 3 initials are the same as your daughter's!

She has rather uncommon name (won't find it on pre-printed tags & such) and she says she loves it. Second daughter also has an uncommon name.
But for girls I don't think they get teased for uncommon names specially if they sound "pretty" (which they do). Naming is harder for boys, imo.

Aeryl's picture
Submitted by Aeryl on

B/c of all of the cultural restrictions and masculine expectations we put on boys. As long as it's pretty, a girl can get by, the more exotic the better.

Yeah, and we can't find my daughter's name, at least not her spelling of it, anywhere either, but I couldn't growing up either, even though mine's fairly common. The other spellings of it are just more common.

Submitted by PA_Lady on

I wanted to name my daughter "Emily Elizabeth" (before I knew about the Clifford books) only to realize that with our last name, her initials would be "EEK."